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Deer Hunt Wisconsin 2014

NEWS For Immediate Release: 9-29-14

Contact: Mark LaBarbera, 520-730-9252
Outdoor News Renews Support for Dan Small’s Deer Hunt Wisconsin TV Special

Expanding its audience reach while continuing to deliver timely content, Outdoor News Inc has renewed its sponsorship of Dan Small’s Deer Hunt Wisconsin annual TV special, according to ON President Rob Drieslein. He noted how important it is – in the wake of the deer trustee report and implementation of changes during the next few years—for the DNR to communicate with the public, and for hunters to learn the new rules. He pledged Outdoor News resources to help readers and viewers.

The goal of the hour-long broadcast is to review what every hunter needs to know and make it easier for viewers to understand the changes being implemented in 2014, 2015, and beyond.

Dan Small' DEER HUNT Wisconsin 2014 begins airing November 06, 2014

Dan Small’s DEER HUNT Wisconsin 2014 to begin airing NOV 06, 2014. Watch our website dansmalloutdoors.com for details.

“We welcome Outdoor News’ renewed support and cross-promotions that help readers, viewers, the DNR and advertisers,” said host Dan Small, noting this is the 24nd year of producing the popular deer specials that air on Milwaukee Public Television, Wisconsin Public Television, Fox Sports North, and Fox Sports Wisconsin, plus the DNR’s website and other online sites, at about the time 670,000 licensed hunters are gearing up for the Wisconsin gun deer season. Small said the number of airings will be more than double last year’s total, expanding the audience size and reach for this timely information.

Sponsors and airtimes will be promoted in Outdoor News, a paid circulation newspaper devoted to covering the outdoors and is delivered weekly in Minnesota and bi-weekly in Wisconsin and other states.

Outdoor News, Inc. is celebrating 47 years of publishing for deer hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts across the Great Lakes region. Launched in Minnesota in 1968, Outdoor News now publishes separate, state-specific outdoor newspapers and websites in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois.

Each state has its own website. More than 250,000 outdoor enthusiasts subscribe to one of the seven Outdoor News newspapers. Total readership, including paid circulation, pass-along readership, and free distribution delivers more than 750,000 hunters and anglers. Every state operates independently and boasts its own editors, writers and sales staff who live, hunt, fish, sell, and write in their respective state.

ON President Rob Drieslein said, “Our editors and writers like Dan Small are trained, award-winning newspaper journalists committed to reporting news related to the outdoors and writing features to help our readers. This focus on quality, local journalism has led to a subscriber renewal rate that exceeds 85 percent and sustained growth every year.”

ON Marketing Director Evy Gebhardt added, “The Deer Hunt Wisconsin team knows that our readers are very active in the outdoors and enjoy many activities: 94 percent hunt, 92 percent fish, 70 percent are wildlife watchers and feeders. They enjoy each issue of Outdoor News spending over one hour reading each issue from cover-to-cover, just as they look forward to the annual Deer Hunt Wisconsin TV show.”

Sponsors of the show include …
Bad Boy Buggies Badgerland SCI Chapter Barnett Crossbows
Dogbone Enterprises Henry Repeating Arms Hunting Works for Wisconsin
MEC Real Avid The Range of Richfield
Tuffy’s Outpost Valley Snowmobile & Powersports Wern Valley Sportsmen’s Club
White Knuckle Productions Wicked Tree Gear Wildlife Research Center
Whitetails Unlimited Wisconsin Buck & Bear Club Dept. of Tourism and Dept. of Natural Resources

For more information visit the Outdoor News website. To explore sponsorship availability for the Deer Hunt Wisconsin 2014 on Fox Sports North, Fox Sports Wisconsin and public television, plus cross-promotion in Outdoor News, contact Mark LaBarbera.

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Fall wild turkey and ruffed grouse seasons open Sept. 15

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2012 fall wild turkey and ruffed grouse seasons are set to open, hunter prospects look good.illustration c. OOAK Digital Gallery ©2012

MADISON – The 2012 fall wild turkey and ruffed grouse seasons are set to open, and state wildlife officials say that hunter prospects are good for both seasons. The turkey season will open statewide at the start of shooting hours on Sept. 15, as will the grouse season in Zone A. Grouse hunters interested in pursuing grouse in southeastern Wisconsin should be aware that the grouse season does not open until Oct. 20 in Zone B.

Overall, Wisconsin’s statewide wild turkey population remains strong, and wildlife officials have set the number of fall turkey permits available at 96,700, a 1,000-permit increase over the number of permits offered during last year’s fall turkey season. Permits were increased by 600 in Zone 2 and by 400 in Zone 7 in order to better accommodate demand by hunters.

Ruffed grouse populations in Wisconsin appear to be entering a downswing, according to this spring’s drumming survey results. Ruffed grouse populations are known to boom and bust over an 8-11 year period, and the index that the state uses to track ruffed grouse numbers decreased statewide by 25 percent between 2011 and 2012. This decrease isn’t a surprise, as Wisconsin was overdue for the expected downturn, but weather conditions in the spring were excellent for nesting and brood-rearing, and should mean a good year for reproduction. First-year birds may therefore help offset the cyclic downturn in numbers, and hunters can expect good hunting again during the 2012 season.

Fall wild turkey and ruffed grouse season dates and reminders

2012 Fall Wild Turkey Season Dates (all zones):

  • Sept. 15 through Nov. 15

2012 Fall Wild Turkey Extended Season Dates for Zones 1-5 ONLY:

  • Nov. 26 through Dec. 31

2012 Ruffed Grouse Season Dates:

  • Zone A: Sept. 15, 2012 through Jan. 31, 2013
  • Zone B: Oct. 20 through Dec. 8

2012 Woodcock Season
Sept. 22 through Nov. 5

For more information, see the Wisconsin wild turkey, ruffed grouse, and Harvest Information Program pages on the DNR website.

Read more here:

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

  • Scott Walter, upland wildlife ecologist: (608) 267-7861
  • Krista McGinley, assistant upland wildlife ecologist: (608) 261-8458

Turkey and grouse hunting have special safety concerns

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“Wear blaze orange clothing and stay in visual contact with your hunting partners at all times.”Part of the mindset necessary for a safe hunting season.photo c. Dan Small Outdoors, LLC. ©2012

MADISON — Hunters need to keep safety in mind when hunting turkey and grouse.

“There’s something very special about turkey and grouse hunting,” says Jon King Department of Natural Resources hunter education program administrator. “And with the enthusiasm that goes along with this type of hunting, we should all be mindful of making sure we return home safe and sound at the end of each hunt.”

Here are some things King says hunters need to keep in mind when going afield after ruffed grouse and fall turkey:

Follow the four basic rules of firearm safety: TAB+K.

  • Treat every firearm as if it is loaded.
  • Always point the muzzle in a safe direction.
  • Plan your hunt and hunt your plan.
  • Know your safe zone of fire, know where your hunting partners are and always advance forward in unison and don’t get ahead of or behind your hunting partner.
  • Be certain of your target and what’s beyond it.
  • Shooting into thick cover or heavy brush without positive identification can lead to a tragedy.
  • Wear blaze orange clothing and stay in visual contact with your hunting partners at all times. If you lose sight of each other, stop hunting, call, and listen until you locate each other.
  • Other hunters and non-hunters will be afield so take the time needed to ensure you have a safe shot.
  • Keep your finger outside the trigger guard until you’re ready to shoot.
  • 34 percent of hunting incidents are self-inflicted and preventable.

King suggests that you advise someone else of where you will be hunting and when they should expect you back. If something should go wrong, at least someone will know where to start looking.

“Famed conservationist Aldo Leopold once wrote, ‘There are two kinds of hunting: ordinary hunting, and ruffed grouse hunting,’” King says. “Don’t let careless hunting practices spoil this special tradition.”

Read more here:

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

  • Jon King, hunter education program administrator: 608-575-2294

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Wolf regulations now available online and soon in hardcopy

newspic1-wolf
Regulations for WI 2012 Wolf Hunting/Trapping are set and available in hardcopy

photo c. WDNR ©2012

MADISON – The 2012 Wolf Hunting and Trapping Regulations [PDF] are now available on the Department of Natural Resources website search the keyword “wolf.” Hard copies are going to print and will be mailed to successful applicants along with notification that they have drawn a permit.

As of Tuesday morning August 28, 15,708 hunters and trappers have submitted applications for Wisconsin’s first modern wolf hunting season, putting their names into the lottery for what is expected to be roughly 1,100 harvest permits. The permit application period closes Aug 31. Even if a hunter or trapper doesn’t draw a permit this year, applying will give them a preference point, and a better chance, in future drawings.

A permit application costs $10 and may be purchased through the DNR Online Licensing Center, at all authorized license agents, at DNR Service Centers (Hours for service centers vary; check the DNR website for service center days and hours of operation; DNR Service Centers are not open on Saturdays), or by calling toll-free 1-877-LICENSE (1-877-945-4236).

Those selected for a harvest permit this year will receive notification by mail in early September following the drawing. Everyone else will receive a preference point toward next season’s drawing.

Hunters and trappers may also wish to check out the department’s wolf webpage, which offers identification tips, maps, reports and pack territory information.

Read more here:

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

  • Scott Walter,(608) 267-7861
  • Krista McGinley, 608) 261-8458

Fall migration takes wing as experts keep an eye out for drought impacts

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Hummingbirds are among the next wave of winged migrants to head south.

photo c. WDNR ©2012 Ryan Brady

Great birding opportunities abound

MADISON – The avian parade continues with hummingbirds, warblers and vireos the next species to begin their migration south, providing Wisconsin birders some great viewing opportunities and experts more insight into how the early spring and drought has affected Wisconsin’s winged travelers.

“The next three weeks will be the peak of fall migration for land birds that migrate to central and south America,” says Andy Paulios, a Department of Natural Resources biologist. “We’re past peak for orioles, but birders should expect to see good numbers of hummingbirds, warblers, vireos, thrushes and other migrants in their local migration hotspots or even in their backyard if they have good natural cover.”

Paulios says that birders should also watch the skies over the next few days as they could expect to see migrating common nighthawks and chimney swifts in the evening.

What exactly will turn up and when on the landscape and at birdfeeders, however, is uncharted territory given the warm, early spring, record heat and the drought experienced in much of the state, says Kim Grveles, an avian biologist with DNR’s Endangered Resources Bureau.

“It’s hard to know exactly what we’ll see with migrations this fall,” Grveles says. “Warm weather definitely brought the short-distance (overwinter in southern U.S.) migrants up north earlier than usual and some long-distance migrants as well. But they do not seem to be leaving for wintering grounds sooner.”

Paulios suspects that migration through drought-stricken areas of Wisconsin will be more stressful this year. “My guess is that there will be less food for insect eaters in dry years as many insects have moisture-dependent abundances…but birds are very adaptable and may be able to move or adjust along their routes.”

“Homeowners can always help by providing a water source and by providing native trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants that produce lots of bugs and fruit for birds to eat and shelter during migration,” he says.

Gveles says that the hummingbirds she’s seen in the Madison area are struggling to find food because the blossoms just aren’t there because of the drought. “So the feeders become really important,” she says. “There is less seed available because of things not flowering due to the drought for gold finches and even for migratory birds that depend on seeds, like towhees, finches and grosbeaks.

“Flyover land” a vital stopover in fall and birding mecca

Every spring and fall, tens of millions of migrating birds sweep through Wisconsin and other Great Lakes states and stop at a variety of sites on their way to breeding grounds as far north as Greenland and the Arctic Ocean and wintering grounds as far south as Argentina’s Tierra del Fuego. These stopover sites provide birds with critical food and shelter en route, a function described in “Respites for Migratory Birds,” in the August 2011 Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine.

They also provide bird watchers a unique opportunity.

“The beauty of migration is you don’t have to go to the world’s best birding place to see these beautiful birds,” Paulios says. “On some days, these things will be in your backyard. So explore your local parks and natural areas.”

Paulios says the general rule of thumb for finding fall migrants is to look for shrubby, woody edges with morning sun. These places tend to have the right mix of fruit and bugs, especially if they get morning sun. Native bushes and trees with fruit like black cherry trees, viburnum or dogwoods are a draw for many bird species.

Read more here:

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

  • Kurt Thiede – 608-266-5833

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